So last time I talked a bit about the four different models you can adopt for a “to-hit” mechanic. This time I’ll focus a bit on the ones involving randomness.

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Across many genres we have the following dilemma for the game designer: I want the player to attack someone, but how do I model that? While people are instinctively familiar with the main solutions, we often don’t think about the different choices and what it means for the game. I thought I might jazz a bit on the taxonomy of the “to-hit” mechanic to explore the idea. Note that we don’t necessarily have to be modelling combat, but it’s the most common example with an easy-to-use vocabulary. This sort of stuff applies equally to fishing in a social game, many board game mechanics, making items in a MMORPG, sweet-talking someone or just gambling.

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I’m ever thinking about game design for Kung Fu Legends. One thing I’m concerned about is that it is supposed to be a sandbox game. In such a game, how do you push a player forward to experience fun things? I thought I might look at a bunch of games I’m playing at the moment, figure out how they do it and think about that.

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